History of Savannah Georgia

History of Savannah Georgia

The city of Savannah was founded in 1733 by General James Oglethorpe and has been one of America’s most beautiful cities ever since. Its first name was “Savannah,” as it was built at the mouth of the Savannah River on a site selected by Oglethorpe himself. He chose this spot because it had a natural harbor that could be used for trade with other countries.

In addition to being known as the first planned city in America — with streets laid out in a grid pattern and public squares throughout downtown — Savannah is also known as the “Hostess City of the South.” 

History of Savannah Georgia

The nickname comes from its popularity during Prohibition-era speakeasies when bootleggers came here to buy liquor from smugglers who ran rum from Cuba through Florida before bringing it into Georgia by boat. Today, this historic Southern city stands out for its charm and beauty while retaining much of its original architecture thanks to preservation efforts made over time!

The city was founded in 1733 by General James Oglethorpe, the British colonizer.

Oglethorpe was a general in the British Army, and he founded the colony of Georgia. Oglethorpe wanted to create a settlement that would be a refuge for debtors and other people persecuted in England. He also hoped to build a colony where enslaved people could live freely, but they did not have any rights because they were considered property at the time.

The city was initially named Savannah after its native inhabitants. Still, it was later changed to “Savannah” because of confusion with another town called Savanah (now spelled Savannah, GA).

Savannah is one of the best-preserved and most intact historic cities in the United States.

Savannah is one of the best-preserved and most intact historic cities in the United States. The National Historic Landmark District, established in 1966 and encompassing 34 square miles (88 km2), comprises Georgia’s first chartered city. A diverse assortment of properties reflects Savannah’s historical importance as a seaport; colonial (and antebellum) city; 19th-century railroad hub; cotton processing center; and the mecca for wealthy Northerners seeking relief from tuberculosis.[1]

Savannah’s streetscapes of restored homes, public squares, and landscaped parks contain over twenty-nine separately designated National Register Historic Districts.[2] The city has 50 squares,[3] 100 churches,[4] 17 museums[5] including the Telfair Museum of Art (the oldest art museum in Georgia),[6][7] 26 cemeteries[8][9], 24 parks[10][11], six bridges across the Savannah River,[12] five colleges[13], two private golf courses,[14][15], three theaters,[16][17][18], 11 annual festivals/events,[19][20](including Chatham Walk Weekend),[21] numerous bars/pubs/clubs, etc., multiple bed & breakfasts, etc., many restaurants, several arts & crafts galleries, etc., more shopping opportunities than any other American city its size

Savannah was one of the world’s first planned communities, designed with public squares throughout the downtown area, with streets laid out in a grid pattern.

Savannah is one of the world’s first planned communities, designed with public squares throughout the downtown area, with streets laid out in a grid pattern. General James Oglethorpe laid out the city on a site chosen for its natural beauty and proximity to trade routes.

The city is famous for its many public squares, which are used extensively as open spaces by residents and visitors alike. Some of these include Washington Square Park, Lincoln Square (both named after US presidents), Telfair Square (named after Edward Telfair), and Ellis Square (named after William Ellison). Savannah’s architecture contains many styles, including Victorian architecture (which can be found along River Street), antebellum mansions on Reynolds Street and Monterey Square; Greek Revival homes such as those found at Wormsloe Plantation; art deco buildings such as those along Franklin Boulevard; historic colonial buildings such as those along Bay Street; modern skyscrapers like One Beach Street Plaza Hotel & Spa; and other contemporary buildings around town.

One of America’s most beautiful cities, Georgia’s first city and a National Historic Landmark District, Savannah, is also known as the “Hostess City of the South.”

Savannah is the oldest city in Georgia and was founded in 1733, making it one of America’s most historic cities. Known as the “Hostess City of the South,” Savannah’s charm attracts over 10 million visitors annually. Savannah was established by James Oglethorpe, who was responsible for establishing a new colony in Georgia (originally called “Georgia,” but eventually named after King George II). The city became one of America’s most beautiful cities due to its wide tree-lined streets and squares, which Oglethorpe himself designed.

Savannah remained an important port during the Civil War, with Union troops occupying it twice between 1862 and 1864. During this period, many buildings were destroyed or damaged; however, much of Savannah’s historical architecture remains intact today because local citizens took great care to restore their homes during this era before tourism took off again after World War II

The town plan for Savannah was laid out by General Oglethorpe and includes four “wards” — northern, southern, eastern, and western — which are all separated by significant roads that radiate from Montgomery Square (now Johnson Square).

The town plan for Savannah was laid out by General Oglethorpe and includes four “wards”—northern, southern, eastern, and western—which are all separated by significant roads that radiate from Montgomery Square (now Johnson Square). The square is bounded on the west by Lincoln Street, on the north by Gaston Street, on the east by Chippewa Square and East Broad Street, and the south by Martin Luther King Jr. Blvd. Many other squares surrounded it at one time, but those have been knocked down over time or absorbed into larger ones, such as Wright Square (located at Ellis Square) or Telfair Square (located at Forsyth Park).

Each ward included public squares, some of which have been lost over time, but others remain.

Many original squares have been lost over time, but others remain. For example, if you visit Savannah today, you can see three public spaces: Chippewa Square, Telfair Square, and Franklin Square. In addition to being laid out in a grid pattern like the rest of the city, each ward included public squares that were important gathering places for citizens (and still are).

Savannah’s early history is centered on its “trustee system,” which was first developed after Oglethorpe arrived in 1733.

British General James Oglethorpe founded the colony of Georgia in 1733. The trustee’s system was a governmental structure he developed as part of his plan for Savannah. He wanted to establish “a civil and martial town” that could serve as a buffer between the Native Americans and other colonies on the coast. This system would be used until 1752 when it was replaced with an elected government based on property ownership.

During this period, the trustee system created a sense of community among those living in Savannah. It required all residents to participate in civic projects such as building roads and bridges or protecting against Indian attacks. This made life safer for everyone, especially women and children who were vulnerable without men around (and sometimes even with them).

Under this plan, the trustees were responsible for overseeing all aspects of the colony and town for 21 years after its founding.

Under this plan, the trustees were responsible for overseeing all aspects of the colony and town for 21 years after its founding. They were also given the authority to make decisions on behalf of the entire community in cases where they needed to reach a consensus.

During these years, no private land ownership was allowed in an attempt to reduce debt and encourage settlement by working-class citizens — a move that would help to set Savannah apart from other Southern cities as well as give it a strong sense of community pride.

During these years, no private land ownership was allowed in an attempt to reduce debt and encourage settlement by working-class citizens — a move that would help to set Savannah apart from other Southern cities as well as give it a strong sense of community pride. Under the trustees’ watchful eye, taxes were low, streets were clean and tidy, public order was maintained, and a thriving economic climate prevailed.

In 1733 the colony’s charter expired without renewal. The trustees stepped down from their positions but retained control over the local government until 1752, when Georgia became a royal colony (a portion of which became known as South Carolina). Savannah multiplied into one of America’s most important ports during this time.

Conclusion

So, there you have it — a brief history of Savannah, Georgia. It’s a city with a rich and fascinating past that continues to grow today. If you’re planning a trip to this historic town, we hope these facts help you make the most of your visit!

4 thoughts on “History of Savannah Georgia”

  1. I really like your article about Savannah! It really made me time-travel. I also liked your explanations about the foundation of the city, as well as the fact that it is unique in the South. I really liked that it’s a one af the most historical cities of the US that is well conserved. I also love squares, so I might go there one day if I pop up there!

    1. The squares are great peaceful relaxing environment. You can sit there relax on a bench and enjoy the beauty of the city. 

  2. Learning about the history of Savannah, Georgia was so fun. I never knew historic towns like Savannah existed in the United States! I would love to travel to Savannah some day to check out what you mentioned in this article. Are there other historic towns I should check out or places I should go in Georgia?

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